Basket ball descriptive essay

We're attempting to find primary sources for these two stories. So far, we've checked Robert Carruthers, The Life of Alexander Pope 2nd edition (London: 1862), and Samuel Johnson's life of Pope, and note that both used Spence's Anecdotes (complete edition published in 1819 when it was edited and published by Samuel Weller Singer); Carruthers notes William Ayre's Memoires of his Life and Writings (1745) is "careless and worthless." We've skimmed Ayre (2 vol.; over 700 pages), without result. We've also skimmed through four volumes of The Correspondence of Alexander Pope , edited by George Sherburn (Oxford: Clarendon, 1956) and have scanned the exhaustive index which is the entire contents of vol. v. We've dipped into Maynard Mack's definitive biography, Alexander Pope, a Life (New Haven, Yale: 1985). From Pope's birth until ca 1700, he lived in a London row house whose garden (handy when keeping dogs in the 17th century, as now) seems mostly to have consisted of cisterns; his father then retired from the linen business and removed his family to the village of Binfield, Berkshire, near Windsor; Pope (who was increasingly crippled by Pott's disease--tuberculosis of the bone--probably contracted from his wet-nurse) moved to his riverfront villa at Twickenham in 1720. At Binfield, "in the intervals of his reading, he wandered about...with his spaniel at his heels ('a little one, a lean one, and none of the finest Shap'd,' [he wrote] ... evidently remarking a certain affinity between master and dog)..." (Mack, p. 73). Sherburn's collection is inclusive; Pope recognized even very small kindnesses; but we failed to find mention of a gold watch (most likely donor-queen: George II's Queen Caroline; on the other hand, if lost on the hunting field: Queen Anne). In relation to a dishonest valet: 12 September 1724: "...my man Robert proves a vile fellow, and I have discarded him; auri sacra fames is his crime..." (vol. ii, p 257), however there's no description of a dog's dramatic role in the valet's arrest. Mack includes under the index-heading "Pope, Alexander" a sub-heading: "dogs owned by" and states, "All his life long, so far as can now be ascertained, Pope had kept dogs...in...1716...it was a male named Bounce. The dog standing by Pope's knee and looking fondly up at him in a painting by Richardson of about 1718, is very possibly the same, a large tan-colored hound with 'A. Pope' inscribed on his collar. By 1729, when the Dunciad had made Pope the object of physical threats, he took with him for his walks upriver to visit the Fortescues, along with his pistols, 'a great faithful Danish dog' (as his sister describes it), again named Bounce and presumably of the same general configuration as our present-day Great Dane; and this is clearly the configuration of the very large animal in the riverfront view of Pope's villa that Curll, to annoy him, had engraved in 1735 in put on sale in his shop" (p. 676). Mack relates (p. 490) that "by 1 June 1728...hardly more than a fortnight after the first Dunciad 's appearance, the story circulated that two 'Gentlemen' had met with him in Ham Walks (then a somewhat parklike area just across the Thames from Pope's house) and disciplined him severely....the story is probably pure fiction, though it is worth noting that Pope took the trouble to repudiate it publically on June 14 in The Daily Post ..." Male Bounces were followed by a female Bounce, who had puppies. Andreas Rysbrack engraved a view of Pope's villa (1735; Mack, p. 361) which shows three dogs on the lawn which descends to the Thames. One, near the house, is a large hound-like dog, perhaps one or another of the several Bounces; two smaller dogs of indeterminate breed are gamboling mid-way up the slope. Either could be Marquess/Marquise.

Basket ball descriptive essay

basket ball descriptive essay

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